Daily Briefs

Judge thwarts crackdown on unlicensed medical pot shops


LANSING, Mich. (AP) — A Michigan judge has blocked yet another attempt by state officials to shut down unlicensed medical marijuana provisioning centers.

About 50 unlicensed shops in Michigan were set to be shut down by regulators. But Michigan Court of Claims Judge Stephen Borrello signed a temporary restraining order Thursday that prevents state regulators from enforcing a licensing deadline that had been set for Sunday.

The judge’s order means that the unlicensed shops can keep their doors open for at least another two weeks.

The Bureau of Marijuana Regulation said in a statement Friday that Sunday’s licensing deadline would not be enforced.

State officials have tried to impose a deadline for licensure since September 2018, but it’s been pushed back multiple times due to legal challenges and official intervention.

 

General Motors seeks dismissal of union  lawsuit on closures


LORDSTOWN, Ohio (AP) — Attorneys for General Motors have asked a federal judge to dismiss a lawsuit claiming the automaker sidestepped an agreement with union workers through its plans to idle three plants, including one in Ohio.

The Warren Tribune Chronicle reports GM’s motion argues the United Auto Workers didn’t exhaust grievance arbitration procedures contained in the contract. The motion says the contract bars the union from going to court over a contractual dispute while grievances remain open.

The GM motion says two grievances over plant idling are pending.

The UAW sued GM in February over a breach of contract claim, trying to stop GM from closing its assembly plant in Lordstown, Ohio, and transmission plants in White Marsh, Maryland, and Warren, Michigan.    A message seeking comment was left at the union’s Detroit offices.

 

Commission: Michigan should not set THC limit for motorists
 

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — A state commission says Michigan should not set a legal limit for how much of marijuana’s active ingredient motorists can have in their system.

The Impaired Driving Safety Commission recently forwarded its findings to Gov. Gretchen Whitmer and the Legislature after spending nearly two years studying how marijuana affects drivers.

The Lansing State Journal reports the panel recommended that Michigan set no limit for the amount of marijuana’s active ingredient is in a motorist’s blood.

The commission’s report says levels of tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, in a person’s blood are not a “reliable indicator” of whether they’re impaired.

The panel instead recommended that the state continue to use roadside sobriety tests to determine if a driver is impaired.

Michigan approved medical marijuana use in 2008, and recreational marijuana use last year.