National Roundup

Pennsylvania
Suspect's hand cut off with machete during home invasion

NORTHAMPTON, Pa. (AP) - A Pennsylvania man says his son defended himself with a machete during a home invasion and used it to cut off one suspect's hand.

Police didn't immediately identify the two home invasion suspects who are in custody. They say the man who lost his hand was brought to a hospital early Sunday by car.

Northampton police Chief Ronald Morey says the man entered an apartment late Saturday where 28-year-old Troy Imbody lived. Imbody's father, Robert, tells reporters that three men came in to "rough up" his son.

Troy Imbody hasn't been charged as police continue to investigate. A sign since posted on Imbody's door says, "Come with two, leave with one" and "Beware of Troy."

Florida
Man arrested by wildlife officersfor stealing sea turtle eggs

TEQUESTA, Fla. (AP) - Wildlife officials in Florida say a man is accused of taking more than 100 sea turtle eggs from a beach behind a home on Jupiter Island.

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission says in a news release that 49-year-old Glenn Robert Shaw was arrested Friday after the agency received tips that someone had been poaching the sea turtle eggs.

Wildlife officers increased patrols in northern Palm Beach County. The news release says they saw Shaw taking the eggs as a loggerhead turtle was laying them Friday night.

The agency says Shaw had 107 eggs. Wildlife officers kept 15 as evidence and the remaining eggs were buried by agency biologists.

Shaw remains in the Palm Beach County Jail on a $3,000 bond. Records don't indicate whether he has a lawyer.

Florida
Police: Mother used infant to beat up boyfriend at the beach

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (AP) - An 18-year-old woman has been arrested after police in Florida say she used her infant son to batter her boyfriend.

Beach Safety Ocean Rescue Captain Tammy Marris tells local news outlets the 6-month-old boy was taken to a hospital Monday afternoon where he was reportedly doing OK.

Officers responded shortly before 4:30 p.m. Monday to a beach in Daytona Beach. Marris says responders found Tatyana Allen had battered her boyfriend, also the baby's father, with the child.

Officers arrested Allen on charges of battery and infliction of physical/mental injury on a child. She was being held Monday night without bail. It's unclear whether Allen has an attorney.

Arizona
Horse program helps inmates get life back on right track

FLORENCE, Ariz. (AP) - A program that allows Arizona prison inmates to help break wild horses is also helping to tame recidivism rates.

The Arizona Republic reports that the Wild Horse Inmate Program, known as WHIP, at a state prison in Florence is being credited with bringing about positive changes for participating inmates who work with horses rounded up by the Bureau of Land Management on Arizona's public rangelands.

About 50 inmates who have completed the program have been released since 2012, and the recidivism rate among them is zero, according to program officials. Nationwide, the recidivism rate is exponentially higher, with about two-thirds of released prisoners arrested and behind bars again within three years, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics.

Several of the released Arizona inmates who once participated in the program have found work on the outside with horses - proving that the skills gained in the program have practical real-world benefits and life lessons.

"What I learn from my horses is patience, love and caring, and trust," said Dashonte Abdul Al-Wakil, who has been serving time the past 18 years for second-degree murder and drug violations. "When these horses first come in, their problem is trust. When I first come into prison, that was my problem."

Al-Wakil is one of about 30 prisoners in Florence currently participating in the program run by Randy Helm, a 62-year-old horse whisperer and fourth-generation Arizonan who grew up on ranches. Helm tells the Republic that he first began training wild horses more than 20 years ago, and describes the process as tricky but rewarding.

"There's a process to get there and you can't take short cuts," Helm said. "A lot of these guys are in prison because they circumvent the process. I've had guys figure that out on their own, they say, 'I never saw anything through to that amazing, fulfilling feeling when you accomplish something that you've worked towards.' "

The sense of accomplishment that comes with seeing through a project to its end is one of the major pluses of WHIP, Helm said.

While the program has turned out to have benefits for prisoner rehabilitation, the original intent behind the collaboration between the Arizona Department of Corrections and the Bureau of Land Management was simply to create an inmate work program.

With the program still young, he said he hopes the zero-percent recidivism rate among participating inmates holds.

"We ask a horse to yield one thing at a time, not be rideable immediately, but to be better every day," Helm said. "We let these horses prove themselves; why can't we let these inmates prove themselves as well?"

New Jersey
Prosecutors say man paid woman to allow himto abuse girls

ENGLEWOOD, N.J. (AP) - Prosecutors say a New Jersey man paid a Philadelphia woman to allow him to sexually assault two girls for years.

Alfredo Rosales, of Englewood, and Esperanza Mani-Cortez each face three counts of aggravated sexual assault, two counts each of sexual assault and child endangerment, and single counts of aggravated criminal sexual contact.

Bergen County prosecutors say they learned Friday that the 51-year-old Rosales might be engaging in sexual activity with a 14-year-old girl. They say an investigation determined Rosales had been sexually assaulting the 14-year-old and a 12-year-old girl since 2010.

Authorities wouldn't say whether Rosales or the 44-year-old Mani-Cortez was related to the children. They say Mani-Cortez made the girls available in return for "financial compensation."

Listed phone numbers weren't available for them. It's unclear if they have attorneys.

Published: Wed, Jul 06, 2016

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