At a Glance ...

Trial delayed in right-to-work lawsuit

LANSING — A lawsuit alleging Michigan’s right-to-work law violates the state’s Open Meetings Act has been delayed.

The Lansing State Journal reports that Ingham County Circuit Judge William Collette signed off on a new trial date for March. It had originally been scheduled for October.
Attorneys for labor groups who brought the suit say they need more time to prepare.

The suit stems from Capitol protests when authorities locked the building and kept additional people from entering amid growing safety concerns. Challengers say doors were closed for several hours as the legislation was first debated.

Republican Gov. Rick Snyder signed the legislation five days later and it took effect in March.

The right-to-work law prohibits requiring workers to pay union dues or fees.

•  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •

Second trial set for cop in girl’s death

DETROIT (AP) — A judge has set a December date for the second trial of a Detroit police officer who admits he accidentally shot and killed a seven-year-old girl during a raid.

Joseph Weekley is charged with involuntary manslaughter in the death of Aiyana Stanley-Jones in May 2010. The first trial ended in June without a verdict.

Weekley’s gun went off in a raid on a Detroit home to catch a murder suspect.

Separately, Judge Cynthia Gray Hathaway refused to drop a $10,000 fine slapped on WJBK-TV, known as Fox 2. A cameraman caught the faces of some jurors during the first day of trial.

WJBK attorney James Stewart calls it a “regrettable mistake.” The judge says Fox 2 is barred from her court until it pays.

•  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •

Ruling on debit-card fee cap appealed

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve is appealing a recent ruling that struck down its cap on how much banks can charge businesses for processing debit card transactions.
The Fed is seeking in a federal appeals court to overturn U.S. District Judge Richard Leon’s ruling last month.

Leon said at the time that the Federal Reserve didn’t have the authority to set the limit the way it did in 2011, and that it improperly included data that made the cap — an average 24 cents per transaction — too high.

Congress mandated a ceiling on debit-card swipe fees as part of the 2010 financial regulatory overhaul.

Leon’s ruling was a victory for a coalition of retail groups, which sued the Fed over its cap. The Fed had initially proposed a 12-cent fee limit, and the retailers argued that the Fed buckled under pressure from bank lobbyists when it doubled that level.

•  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •

Photographer sues Kanye West over scuffle

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A photographer who claims he was attacked by Kanye West at Los Angeles International Airport has sued the rapper, claiming assault, battery, negligence and violation of his civil rights.

Daniel Ramos claimed his right hip was injured when the rapper punched him in an unprovoked attack and wrestled his camera to the ground. Ramos was a member of the paparazzi who staked out at the airport July 19 to snap celebrity photos.

Last week, the Los Angeles County district attorney’s office declined to file felony assault and attempted robbery charges against West, saying Ramos didn’t have a significant injury.

The city attorney’s office is considering whether to file misdemeanor charges.

•  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •

Comments

  1. No comments
Sign in to post a comment »