State Supreme Court appoints prosecutor grievance administrator

 The Michigan Supreme Court has appointed Alan M. Gershel, veteran federal prosecutor and law school professor, to be grievance administrator for the Attorney Grievance Commission (AGC), the investigative and prosecutorial arm of the Supreme Court for allegations of attorney misconduct.

“Mr. Gershel has a focused vision for the future, decades of experience successfully managing a team of attorneys, and a reputation for professional integrity that will be a credit to the AGC,” said Michigan Supreme Court Chief Justice Robert P. Young, Jr.
Gershel, a 1978 graduate of University of Detroit Mercy School of Law, most recently taught at Thomas M. Cooley Law School in Lansing, where he joined the full-time faculty in 2008. Previously, he served in the U.S. Attorney’s Office, Eastern District of Michigan in Detroit, for nearly 30 years, including appointment as Chief of the Criminal Division from 1989-2008. He has also been a hearing panelist for the Michigan Attorney Discipline Board for more than 20 years, including service as chair of a hearing panel.
He has earned numerous honors and recognitions, including the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law Moot Court Alumni Member of the Year, the Department of Justice Director’s Award for Superior Performance in a Managerial Role, the Federal Bar Association “Outstanding Practitioner in Criminal Law” Award, and the Department of Justice Director’s Award for Superior Performance as an Assistant U.S. Attorney.
With a mission of protecting the public, the AGC is responsible for investigating allegations of misconduct by attorneys practicing law in Michigan. By court rule, the Michigan Supreme Court appoints the nine members who serve as volunteer commissioners as well the grievance administrator and deputy administrator.
Starting on October 13, as grievance administrator, Gershel will manage a legal staff of 13 attorneys and a support staff of 15, including three investigators. He also will oversee requests for investigation and other complaints and the disciplinary prosecution of matters that the AGC authorizes.
The AGC typically receives 3,300 to 4,000 annual requests for investigation, and approximately eight to 10 percent of those result in the filing of formal charges. Learn more at www.agcmi.com.

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